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Lisa Lucas ‏@likaluca 7m7 minutes ago
.@joegarden wins for finding the most out there cover of “Keep Me Hanging On” — NOW WITH SITAR

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To which yours truly can only add, Yup.

(Source: youtube.com)

Oct 5

Video: Charlie Parr | Watch 30-Minute Music Hour Online | WPT Video

Saw Charlie Parr play last night at the Rockwood Music Hall and he was mind-blowing. He switched back and forth between a fretless banjo (!!) and a 12-string guitar, both of which he played with fingerpicks and slide. This set from WPT’s 30-Minute Music Hour opens with a great version of “Been All Around This World,” a Dead/Garcia favorite.

I saw Alexandra Sauser-Monnig open for Hiss Golden Messenger at Rough Trade last night, and since everyone already knows how much I love HGM—who met and exceeded all expectations—I want to take a minute here and say that Sauser-Monnig’s performance, a mix of covers (Lefty Frizzell, Eddie Arnold, Willie Nelson), gospel, and what I took to be originals, was one of the most moving and beautiful I’ve seen in years. Several songs were performed entirely unaccompanied, the guitar perfectly still in her hands. I love any artist who can make the case for the voice as a solo instrument. It was one of those shows where you wake up the next day and Google every single person who was up on the stage. So AS-M, I learned, has a trio called Mountain Man, and Phil Cook, who played banjo, slide guitar and keys for HGM, turns out to be from Megafaun, whose cover of “Friend of the Devil” (with John Darnielle and Justin Vernon) I posted here back in June. Anyway, these dudes can fucking play. Midway through the set someone in the crowd called out for “Shakedown Street,” which to me meant that even though this was not a “jammy” show—these guys were sticking to very tight, rich, and unexpectedly danceable fullband renditions of their new and old material—the crowd would have happily listened to them play anything they felt like for as long as they felt like playing it. Also that WE ARE ALL DEADHEADS NOW. In which spirit I humbly suggest that Sauser-Monnig & HGM end at least one show with “We Bid You Goodnight” because it will bring the house down and also, maybe, help redeem the world. 

Above, Sauser-Monnig sings “What Wondrous Love Is This” and “Prairie Lullaby.”

Here: Mountain Man covers John Denver’s “Around and Around”

Sep 9

Lateness of Dancers

Of all the things to love about Hiss Golden Messenger’s fantastic new record, Lateness of Dancers—which is out today—I am going to focus on one: the last track, “Drum,” which is also the last track on the album “Bad Debt.” I love it when an artist revisits/revises past work, brings old songs into conversation/context with new ones. This of course happens at lives shows all the time but is much less common in studio. Will Oldham does it. Michael Hurley maybe more than anyone else. It makes perfect sense to me that so many of the “Bad Debt” songs have since appeared on other HGM albums and the new “Drum” is a welcome re-thinking of a track that was solid as hell the first time. It’s also the pitch-perfect conclusion to forty-three powerfully impressive and joyous minutes of music. 


This is the album. Today is the day. That’s all. 

(Hiss Golden Messenger plays a solo version of “Drum” live in a tool shed.)

Sep 8
Sep 8

Episode 14: Rebecca Worby & Justin Taylor

catapultreads:

Today’s readings come together on the idea of leaving the city for something else, for some place that isn’t the city, whether it’s a different town or red rock desert. And in both of these pieces, leaving home does something to how you fall in or out of love.

Rebecca’s essay originally appeared…

Sep 6
doomandgloomfromthetomb:

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Where Am I? Who Am I? What The Fuck Am I Doing Here?
A Summer of Dead exclusive! Sort of. Here’s 80 minutes worth of sweet instrumental jams I’ve culled from the Archive, spanning the years 1968-1975. There’s skronk, there’s space, there’s funk, there’s psych. It’s all in there. Except for vocals. No vocals! I don’t know, there’s no real rhyme or reason here — it’s just some groovy, improv-y explorations that have caught my ear recently. I think you’re going to dig it. 
1. Weir’s Words Of Wisdom (1969-12-11 - Thelma Theater)Ace asks the eternal questions. 
2. Jam #1/Fire On The Mountain theme (1971-08-21 - Mickey Hart’s Barn)One of those killer Novato excursions, totally soaring. Check it all out here, it is a good time. 
3. Jam (1975-04-17 - Ace’s Studio)A chilly, bluesy groove! This low-key studio jam is a little out of character for the Dead, but I like it a lot. Almost JJ Cale-y? 
4. Philo Stomp (1972-11-13 - Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall)This thing starts out slamming around in true noize fashion, but eases into a more gentle vibe. Taken from one of Bear’s only audience tapes. He should’ve done that more, the sound is stellar. 
5. Jam (1970-11-20 - U. of Rochester)An extremely funky workout — almost reminiscent of a chooglin’ Booker T and the MG’s jam sesh. The Weir/Garcia interplay here sizzles. Sizzles, I say!  
6. Spanish Jam (1968-03-30 - Carousel Ballroom)These things are weird, but I’m into it. Very stiff and stentorian and non-freewheeling. 
7. Jam (1973-07-27 - Grand Prix Racecourse)The Dead send good vibes out to the assembled masses at Watkins Glen. Some of this meanders (if you can even believe it) but stick around to the end for a nice bit that sounds to my ears somewhere between “Eyes of the World” and “Fire On The Mountain.” 
8. Weir Outro (1968-05-18 - Santa Clara County Fairgrounds)Bobby takes us out. 

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Where Am I? Who Am I? What The Fuck Am I Doing Here?

A Summer of Dead exclusive! Sort of. Here’s 80 minutes worth of sweet instrumental jams I’ve culled from the Archive, spanning the years 1968-1975. There’s skronk, there’s space, there’s funk, there’s psych. It’s all in there. Except for vocals. No vocals! I don’t know, there’s no real rhyme or reason here — it’s just some groovy, improv-y explorations that have caught my ear recently. I think you’re going to dig it. 

1. Weir’s Words Of Wisdom (1969-12-11 - Thelma Theater)
Ace asks the eternal questions. 

2. Jam #1/Fire On The Mountain theme (1971-08-21 - Mickey Hart’s Barn)
One of those killer Novato excursions, totally soaring. Check it all out here, it is a good time. 

3. Jam (1975-04-17 - Ace’s Studio)
A chilly, bluesy groove! This low-key studio jam is a little out of character for the Dead, but I like it a lot. Almost JJ Cale-y? 

4. Philo Stomp (1972-11-13 - Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall)
This thing starts out slamming around in true noize fashion, but eases into a more gentle vibe. Taken from one of Bear’s only audience tapes. He should’ve done that more, the sound is stellar. 

5. Jam (1970-11-20 - U. of Rochester)
An extremely funky workout — almost reminiscent of a chooglin’ Booker T and the MG’s jam sesh. The Weir/Garcia interplay here sizzles. Sizzles, I say!  

6. Spanish Jam (1968-03-30 - Carousel Ballroom)
These things are weird, but I’m into it. Very stiff and stentorian and non-freewheeling. 

7. Jam (1973-07-27 - Grand Prix Racecourse)
The Dead send good vibes out to the assembled masses at Watkins Glen. Some of this meanders (if you can even believe it) but stick around to the end for a nice bit that sounds to my ears somewhere between “Eyes of the World” and “Fire On The Mountain.” 

8. Weir Outro (1968-05-18 - Santa Clara County Fairgrounds)
Bobby takes us out. 

Sep 3
Flannery O’Connor, “The Nature and Aim of Fiction.” Collected in Mystery and Manners

Flannery O’Connor, “The Nature and Aim of Fiction.” Collected in Mystery and Manners

Sep 3

Marc Demarco covers Angel Olsen’s “Lights Out.” via @aaronpcalvin .

(Source: youtube.com)

"Captain Badass" by The Wave Pictures, from their album Songs of Jason Molina.

(Source: youtube.com)

[With apologies for the continued off-brand content, this is me and this is this interview I did.]

housingworksbookstore:

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before." —Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’
Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

[With apologies for the continued off-brand content, this is me and this is this interview I did.]

housingworksbookstore:

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before."
—Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’

Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

The new Anthony McCann collection, Thing Music, showed up in my mailbox yesterday, and from the moment I opened the package all I could think was SPACE MONOLITH. I love him. The book comes out next month and you should pre-order a copy from your local independent bookseller.

Above, Phish’s cover of the 2001 theme. I tried to find the speed-addled insane one from Brooklyn ‘06 but it looks like they took it off Youtube after the show got an official release. This one is from the legendary “island tour”, 4/4/98. Note that the song runs about 20 minutes, but is broken up for whatever reason into two videos. I’ve chosen to post part 2, so it picks up in media res.

(Source: youtube.com)

lastnightsreading:

Justin Taylor at Book Court, 8/19/14

lastnightsreading:

Justin Taylor at Book Court, 8/19/14

Music consecrates everything and this was a holy moment… Jenny Lewis’s high, honeyed voice swarmed all the space between his ears, and everything she sang was the most important thing he had ever heard before, though he’d long known all these lines by heart.

-

Justin Taylor’s short story collection Flings, which you should buy from an indie bookstore.

There’s another excerpt I can’t post because of spoilers, but it’s about a guy getting a good rhetorical whack upside the head after spilling his sexual longings in the classic women-are-defined-by-my-desires way that I really identified with. Justin’s good at writing the whack-upside-the-head bildungsroman of the modern straight white man.

(via nickdouglas)

Hey, I wrote a book and it was published today. It’s a short story collection called Flings. You can read all about it here and, if you want to, find a bookstore to buy a copy from here, or just buy it online at any of the usual places where that is possible. This is probably a good time to remind readers that I am this person, apologize for the relative lack of on-mission content these past few months, and mention that I also exist on Twitter, @my19thcentury

Above, this tumblr reasserts its devotion to the cover song (if not its actual work ethic) with Blue Cheer’s cover of Eddie Cochran’s “Summertime Blues,” which, pace Wikipedia, may or may not have marked the advent of heavy metal.

(Source: youtube.com)